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 LORETTA LYNN BONNAROO REVIEWS!!, JUNE~2011
Kenny
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 07:20 AM


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Loretta Lynn delivers class, classics at Bonnaroo
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http://blogs.creativeloafing.com/vibes/201...w-june-11-2011/

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Loretta Lynn at Bonnaroo (photo: John Partipilo/The Tennessean)


Loretta Lynn delivers class, classics at Bonnaroo
Posted on June 11, 2011 by Dave Paulson

I wouldn’t expect a country music legend to take requests, but that’s just what the incomparable Loretta Lynn was doing in the thick of the early evening heat at Bonnaroo on Saturday. Lynn delivered the goods, including classics “Don’t Come Home A’ Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ On Your Mind)” and “You Ain’t Woman Enough.”

Between those, the 76-year-old singer-songwriter took some deserved breathers, and her band stepped in with harmlessly fun takes on the Eagles’ “How Long” and (for the second time today) “Man of Constant Sorrow.”

Lynn’s voice isn’t quite the same as in her heyday, but it has the same fragile soul heard so clearly on her Jack White-produced album Van Lear Rose, now seven years old. After her set Saturday, I’m surely not the only one hoping another brand new collection is in Lynn’s future.

http://blogs.tennessean.com/tunein/2011/06...cs-at-bonnaroo/


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ALWAYS FOR LORETTA!!
You'll never do a whole lot unless your brave enough to try~Dolly
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Vicki
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 07:38 AM


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Thank ya Kenny...and isn't this photo just so stunning of Loretta!


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Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.
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Kenny
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 07:44 AM


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Adam Graham/ Detroit News Pop Music Writer


Also of note were performances by a pair of legends, Wanda Jackson and Loretta Lynn. Both talked at length about Jack White during their sets, as the former White Stripe produced albums for both women. Jackson's Friday set saw her describing White as a "velvet brick," meaning he's authoritative and tends to get his way, but is smooth in his methods. And Lynn, during her sassy Saturday performance, teased about White's not being there, saying he left her "high and dry" by not being at the show. "Wait 'til I see him, I'll get him," she joked

From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110612/ENT04/...l#ixzz1P4aSGh64


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ALWAYS FOR LORETTA!!
You'll never do a whole lot unless your brave enough to try~Dolly
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Born Country
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 08:30 AM


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Thanks Kenny for posting,
Just a little side note, I was watching the weather channel and the anchor was talking about the show and the heat and mentioned Loretta was going to be performing at the show.
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Jewel
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 09:41 AM


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Kenny,
Thank you for the post.. I appreciate what you do on here..
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Kenny
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 10:29 AM


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Ya'll are welcome smile.gif here's another snippet:

The Daily Pulse:
Roo Report #4: 11 Things About Bonnaroo on Saturday
By jfm
Posted June 12, 2011 10:41 AM


4. Loretta Lynn. In a festival filled with eminence grises (Wanda Jackson, Buffalo Springfield, Dr. John), 79-year-old Loretta Lynn was the grise-est. It showed, in some ways -- after a strong start to her Saturday evening set, the heat onstage and in the cavernous That Tent clearly started to get to her, and she did one song twice. But that song was "You Ain't Woman Enough (to Take My Man)," so who's complaining? She sounded terrific, her voice still a trenchant Kentucky twang and her phrasing smart and playful. Her set was a reminder that she is, among other things, one of country music's great songwriters: "Fist City," "Don't Come Home A' Drinkin (With Lovin' on Your Mind)," "Dear Uncle Sam," "The Pill," her songs still sound fiery and uncompromising, the templates for generations of tough-minded Nashville women to come. And a mid-set tribute to Patsy Cline, including snippets of "Walkin' After Midnight," "Crazy," and "She's Got You," felt almost like a séance, a visitation from the spirit of Lynn's old friend, who died nearly 50 years ago. Bonnaroo's sense of history, one of the festival's great strengths, has rarely seemed so potent.
http://blogs.metropulse.com/the_daily_puls...gs-about-b.html


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ALWAYS FOR LORETTA!!
You'll never do a whole lot unless your brave enough to try~Dolly
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Kenny
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 03:43 PM


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Bonnaroo roundup part two: Mumford & Sons, Loretta Lynn, Wiz Khalifa
Deer Tick are brats, Patty Griffin joins Mavis Staples, Justin Townes Earle sells snake oil

By Katie Hasty Sunday, Jun 12, 2011 4:23 PM

There’s been a triad of music First Ladies, a series of trailblazers that have shaped the goosebumps on the skin of everyone’s sunburned arms at Bonnaroo. Friday brought the Queen of of Rockailly, Wanda Jackson, among one of my favorite Immaculate Noise interviewees. Last night brought my first full set sit-in, from country great Loretta Lynn. She wore a combination of Flashy Loretta and Down-Home Loretta, with a simple pant-suit with a bibbed, rhinestone shirt. Her petite frame was fragile against her male-dominated, inveterate band and she rarely strayed from her place on stage.

She also never lifted her arms above her shoulder and gestured only slightly, while her voice was strong and happy on songs like “Honky Tonk Girl,” the first song she ever wrote, a montage of “Walkin’ After Midnight” and “Fallin’ to Pieces,” a pair of Conway Twitty tunes, “Fist City” and closer “Coal Miner’s Daughter.” Her own daughters Peggy and Patsy sang a pair of songs together before Lynn took the stage, and her band did their version of “Man of Constant Sorrow,” a song heard for the second time that day (Jerry Douglas and Union Station played their “O Brother Where Art Thou?” take earlier in the day). She, like Wanda, hinted at the presence of Jack White (he's produced music for them both), but the Nashville convert was nowhere onsite.

There was a bit of a to-do as Lynn exited the stage, requiring help from some burly handlers, and a hurried move to her air-conditioned car. She sat down once during her performance. It’s kind of breathtaking, her delicate state.
http://www.hitfix.com/blogs/immaculate-noi...ynn-wiz-khalifa


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ALWAYS FOR LORETTA!!
You'll never do a whole lot unless your brave enough to try~Dolly
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Kenny
Posted: Jun 12 2011, 03:45 PM


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Photo: Steve Cross
Nashville Cream


« Bonnaroo 2011, Day Three: Hairs of…
Sunday, June 12, 2011
Bonnaroo Alison Krauss at Which Stage, Loretta Lynn at That Tent, 6/11/11
Posted by Brantley Hargrove on Sun, Jun 12, 2011 at 3:16 PM ]

Hell was the 4 p.m. slot at Which Stage Saturday. By that time of the day, the pulverized grass and hard-packed dirt were just refracting the heat. Dust swirled as though the Dirty Thirties had returned. The picnic-blanket people were in full effect, bogarting the meager shade and every other good spot. Meanwhile, I was huddling in some burly dude's shadow while no less a talent than Alison Krauss and Union Station drew this cruel short stick.

While chugging lukewarm water in a concerted effort against stroking out in Satan's cauldron, Krauss and Co. dueled the devil with some deft finger-picking, jammy Appalachian bad-assery, and the singer's preternaturally true, melancholy voice. Somewhere around the beginning of her set — details get sketch in the heat warp — a troop of 50 or so mountaintop-removal mining activists marched single-file to the front of the crowd, hoisting placards decrying “clean coal” (see Kingston coal-ash spill) and the steady demolition of Appalachia. The moment was actually poignant, because Krauss, an outspoken opponent of MTR, is one of the most prodigious talents in the world of bluegrass — a form of music inextricably tied the mountains at hazard.

But one can only be so earnest in lethal heat, so I abandoned the large man's shadow I'd awkwardly been coveting and found some shade. Coincidentally, I ended up in That Tent, listening to iconic country standards sung by the aging progeny of a coal miner. The crowd fucking adored Loretta Lynn, and she was eager to please. “Anything y'all want to hear,” she drawled, then proceeded to play the songs we all wanted to hear anyway: “Blue Kentucky Girl,” “Fist City,” “You Ain't Woman Enough (to Take My Man) and a medley weaving Patsy Cline greats like “Walking After Midnight” and “I Fall to Pieces.”

The inexhaustible 79-year-old country queen sounded fantastic. She hit every note. She carried the overwhelmingly young crowd through tunes written nearly a half-century ago with the aplomb and energy you would have expected from her decades earlier. We guffawed when she played “The Pill,” at one time an incredibly controversial manifesto about reproductive choice. In a past cultural epoch, this was subversive stuff. Here, the Porto-John's are probably saturated with the source of so much of the consternation over “The Pill.”

Times have changed, but great entertainers are great entertainers, and Loretta is as adaptable as any of them. This is Bonnaroo, after all — not some sleepy music hall. And she seemed to sense that. So Loretta gave us all a hall pass for the night, which we proceeded to abuse grotesquely: “If someone wants to put a little rum in that Coke, that's their business,” she said. Adorably.

http://www.nashvillescene.com/nashvillecre...that-tent-61111


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ALWAYS FOR LORETTA!!
You'll never do a whole lot unless your brave enough to try~Dolly
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Kenny
Posted: Jun 13 2011, 04:55 PM


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Loretta Lynn Charms Bonnaroo Audience
Alison Krauss & Union Station, Mumford & Sons, Amos Lee Play Tennessee Festival
June 13, 2011; Written by Craig Shelburne

MANCHESTER, Tenn. -- Loretta Lynn earned a rapturous reception Saturday afternoon (June 11) at the Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival, proving you don't have to be the Next Big Thing to draw an adoring crowd at the eclectic, four-day event southeast of Nashville.

The 76-year-old Country Music Hall of Fame member and her band performed just as the sun was starting to set, with hundreds of fans huddled under an awning known as That Tent. For the first time on a dusty, scorching day, the sun dipped low enough to offer some relief, so music fans could give their undivided attention to one of America's true musical treasures.

After a Buck Owens tune by bandleader Bart Hanson and two songs by her twin daughters, Lynn stepped out with "They Don't Make 'Em Like My Daddy Anymore." If anybody didn't know what they were going to get, she told them in a lively version of "You're Looking at Country."

When you give Lynn a microphone, you never know what she'll say. A few songs in, she wanted to hear more of the band in the monitors, then added, "I might be doing a strip show up here and wouldn't know it!"

Later, after the punchy "Fist City," she observed that a lot of people were drinking soft drinks. Turning to Hanson, she smartly added, "If they want to mix that Coke with something else, that's their business." The audience, of course, was lapping it up.

Lynn invited the audience to holler up their requests, which prompted performances of "I Wanna Be Free," "Here I Am Again," "You Ain't Woman Enough," "Blue Kentucky Girl" and more. Her band plays every song at pretty much the same tempo -- and often faster than the originals -- so it's kind of like a whirlwind primer of her music.

That approach might have actually worked in her favor. Lynn enjoyed her biggest success in the 1970s, before the typical Bonnaroo fan was even born. Amid the mature folks, you could spot the uninitiated fans by their eye-opening expressions when Lynn sang about grabbing a cheating woman by the hair of the head and lifting her off the ground. They especially enjoyed the frankness of "One's on the Way" and "The Pill," meshed into one song.

Lynn also took a moment to sing a medley of Patsy Cline songs, including "Walkin' After Midnight," "I Fall to Pieces," "She's Got You" and "Crazy." On the latter track, she must've been inspired by Willie Nelson, who wrote it, because her delivery was just enough off the beat that singing along was pretty tricky.

At the mere mention of Conway Twitty's name, the crowd screamed like crazy -- not exactly what you'd expect at Bonnaroo. Lynn and Hanson sang a sped-up version of "Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man," then got part of the way into "Lead Me On" until Lynn sang the last line where the chorus should have been. When the band got temporarily flummoxed, she shrugged it off and told them, "That's it. I'm tired of this song."

Then, Lynn sang the first song she wrote, "Honky Tonk Girl," which was released as her first single in 1960. After the applause, Lynn remarked that she had invited Jack White, who produced her 2004 album, Van Lear Rose, to come onstage with her. This was met with the kind of response you'd get by telling a kindergarten class that Santa Claus was standing in the hallway. However, Lynn added that White stood her up, and if he had been there, he would've already been onstage.

"He can't stand not to sing," she teased, saying that he doesn't even know when to leave the stage so she can play her own show.

Lynn's feisty nature is well-suited to cheatin' and revenge songs like "Your Squaw Is on the Warpath." After she sang that one, she told the audience, "I wrote that about my husband. He never did listen to it, either." As a songwriter, she continued to exhibit her range with the heartbreaking "Dear Uncle Sam" and the defiant "Don't Come Home a Drinkin' (With Lovin' on Your Mind)." If you've ever argued that modern audiences don't care for the legends, the adoration in this show would have proved you completely wrong.

It's hard to know whether or not she meant to, but Lynn suddenly repeated "You Ain't Woman Enough" in her set list, this time giving the audience a chance to shout the lyrics back to her. And they did -- with fervor.

Lynn took a short break while her harmony singers delivered a few tunes. Then she joined them on a gospel segment, offering "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" (the one about Hezekiah, not the one recorded by Kenny Chesney), "Who Said God Is Dead" and "Where No One Stands Alone."

For her benediction, she rendered her signature hit, "Coal Miner's Daughter," and while they probably weren't too many coal miners' daughters' in the audience that day, you'd never know it by the way they sang along. As the show concluded, one young man walked past me, back into the masses. To no one in particular, he exclaimed, "That was awesome!"

Earlier in the day, Alison Krauss & Union Station performed on the large Which Stage, leading with songs from their exceptional new album, Paper Airplane. And when Dan Tyminski sang "Dust Bowl Children," it fit the sweltering surroundings perfectly. Krauss and her ensemble also relied on tried-and-true favorites, like "Let Me Touch You for a While," "Now That I Found You," "Ghost in This House" and "Every Time You Say Goodbye." She chatted with the crowd in between songs, but her soft speaking voice was drowned out by the rock music from a faraway stage.

At Bonnaroo, you can wander around the festival and hear bands you can't even see. The bold melodies of Mumford & Sons, for example, could be identified from clear across the field. Part of the fun of Bonnaroo is people-watching. As I was watching Old Crow Medicine Show, I saw a lot of phones held stiffly in the air for "Wagon Wheel," but nobody was really singing along. I thought the lack of participation was unusual until the line about "a nice long toke," when pretty much everybody joined in.

For the campers who braved the afternoon sessions, highlights included the blues-rock of Alberta Cross, the rambunctious female duo Miss Willie Brown and the soulful singer-songwriter Amos Lee, along with aspiring musicians of every persuasion, from hip-hop and to reggae and funk.

But if your eyes were on Loretta Lynn, you were lookin' at country.

http://www.cmt.com/news/country-music/1665...-audience.jhtml


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ALWAYS FOR LORETTA!!
You'll never do a whole lot unless your brave enough to try~Dolly
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